1492 CAN’T COME AGAIN SOON ENOUGH

From Diversity Macht Frei, May 31, 2018:

On the Arrogance of Jews as a Factor in Their Downfall

This morning I was reading a book about the Spanish Inquisition then came across a Twitterstorm that seemed strangely congruent with the passage I had been reading.

 

 

A month-old tweet from AlbaRising was picked on by elite Jew Ben Shapiro, who then cackled about it with his elite Jew pals, as if it was a great joke that they had the power to suppress other people’s speech. Having thus been highlighted, AlbaRising’s account will probably now be suspended, which will, of course, make the non-humorous reality of Jewish power clear.

Here is the relevant passage of the book I was reading. It described the situation in 15th century Spain, just before the emergence of the Spanish Inquisition.

Anti-Jewish riots broke out across Spain in 1391. Out of fear, many Jews underwent a nominal conversion. Their new status as “Christians” then allowed them to bypass the professional restraints that had been placed on Jews. They quickly acquired wealth and rose to the top of the Spanish power structure. It soon became clear, however, that these “conversos” did not consider themselves to be “one” with the ancestral Spanish population. On the contrary, the “New Christians” held themselves arrogantly apart and gloated at their power over the “Old Christians”. This provoked anti-converso riots in many parts of Spain. The Spanish Inquisition was ultimately introduced to deal with the problem and the Jews were expelled in 1492.

A factor that undoubtedly contributed to tension, over and above anti- converso feeling, was the conversos’ own sense of a separate identity. Already a powerful minority by the mid-fifteenth century, conversos were secure of their social position and proud to be both Christian and of Jewish descent. They did not, as is sometimes thought, attempt to disguise their origins. They were, as many of their own writers affirmed clearly, a nation. They had their own identity, and took pride in it. Andres Bernaldez reported that they entertained the arrogant claim that there was no better people in the world than they’. Alonso de Palencia reported complaints by Old Christians that the conversos acted ‘as a nation apart, and nowhere would they agree to act together with the Old Christians; indeed, as though they were a people of totally opposed ideas, they openly and brazenly favoured whatever was contrary to the Old Christians, as could be seen by the bitter fruit sown throughout the cities of the realm’. Implicit in the converso attitude was the claim that they were even better than Old Christians, because together with Christian faith they combined direct descent from the lineage (linaje) of Christ. it was said that Alonso de Cartagena when he recited the Hail Mary used to end with the words, `Holy Mary, Mother of God and my blood-relative, pray for us’. Converso nobles were considered to be even better than Old Christian nobles, because they were of Jewish origin. ‘Is there another nation so noble {as the Jews]?’ asked Diego de Valera, quoting the Bible directly. Converso separateness had a certain logic. The large number of converts after 1391 could not be easily fitted into existing social structures. In Barcelona and Valencia in the 1390s they were given their own churches, in each case a former synagogue. They also set up their own converso confraternities. In the crown of Aragon they called themselves proudly ‘Christians of Israel’.They had their own social life and intermarried among themselves. Palencia observed that they were ‘puffed-up, insolent and arrogant’; Bernaldez criticized their ‘haughty ostentation of great wealth and pride’. These converso attitudes were probably created by self-defensiveness rather than arrogance. But they contributed to the wall of distrust between Old and New Christians. In particular, the idea of a converso nation, which rooted itself irrevocably in the mind of Jewish Christians, made them appear as a separate, alien and enemy entity. This had fateful consequences.

Source: The Spanish Inquisition by Henry Kamen

The cycle repeats itself throughout history. Jews acquire some badge of belonging which they take as licence to lord it over the goyim. In 15th century Spain the badge of belonging was conversion to Christianity. In the present day it is a bit of paper that says “U.S. citizen”, “Citoyen de France”, etc. Smugly confident in the shield they think this offers them, Jews unleash their arrogance, unrestrained. They just can’t help themselves. They fail to grasp that the badge of belonging implicitly carries with it an obligation of empathy and community with the non-Jewish population. And when Jews fail to fulfil that obligation, the reaction comes. The cycle repeats. And the Jews learn nothing from the experience. They undergo no moral maturation. Because moral maturation can only come from the ability to acknowledge fault, a problem Jews have always struggled with.

To analogise our own predicament with 15th century Spain, I’d say we’re at about the 1460 stage of the cycle. Things are going to get interesting.

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